Championship History of the New York Mets

Kevin Martoken currently works as a fund accountant with Grassi & Co. in New York City. When he is not functioning as a fund administrator to the firm’s hedge fund clients, Kevin Martoken enjoys supporting the New York Mets.

The New York Mets joined Major League Baseball (MLB) as part of the National League in 1962. As is the case with most new professional sports teams, the Mets struggled over the course of their first few years, failing to secure a winning record up until the 1969 season, when the franchise made a dramatic turnaround. The Mets finished the year with a 100-62 record and went on to win the World Series in five games over the 109-53 Baltimore Orioles.

The Mets won 83 games over each of the following three seasons, failing to qualify for the postseason each time. Despite winning just 82 games in 1973, the Mets made the playoffs and advanced to their second World Series. Facing a more successful Oakland Athletics team, the Mets stretched the series to its limits but eventually fell 5-2 in the seventh game. The team’s up-and-down nature continued, with the Mets failing to play postseason baseball for 12 years before recording 108 wins—a franchise record—during the 1986 season and winning a second World Series, this time in seven games against the Boston Red Sox.

In 1988 the Mets made their first playoff appearance that did not result in a trip to the World Series, falling to the Los Angeles Dodgers in seven games during the National League Championship Series (NLCS). Since that season, the Mets have made it to the playoffs on three occasions, resulting in NLCS losses in 1999 and 2006 as well as a fourth trip to the World Series in 2000, this time losing 4-1 to the New York Yankees.

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