Chase Blackburn: An Underrated New York Giant

Chase Blackburn pic

Chase Blackburn
Image: nfl.com

In his role as a fund accountant at Grassi & Co., Kevin Martoken has provided a variety of services to hedge fund clients, such as financial statement and tax return preparation, capital allocation, audit assistance, and cash reconciliations. In his leisure time, Kevin Martoken enjoys watching New York Giants football.

Names like Phil Simms, Lawrence Taylor, and Eli Manning quickly come to mind when talking about the all-time great New York Giants. There are other important figures, however, who have played a key role in the team’s success over the year. Linebacker Chase Blackburn is one of those individuals.

Blackburn played eight seasons in New York, but perhaps his most memorable contribution came in a year when he wasn’t even in the league for a good part of the year. Desperate for depth at the position, the Giants called Blackburn to come back and play for them a few weeks prior to Super Bowl XLVI. The move would go on to pay massive dividends, as Blackburn provided a key play in the game, snatching an interception on a pass meant for Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski. The turnover kept the Giants in the game–one they would eventually win in the final moments, ruining the Patriots perfect season en route to a Super Bowl victory.

Advertisements

Curtis Granderson Wins Roberto Clemente Award

Curtis Granderson pic

Curtis Granderson
Image: .nydailynews.com

Working out of New York City, Kevin Martoken is fund accountant at Grassi & Co, where he serves as an administrator for the firm’s hedge fund clients. Outside of his professional life, Kevin Martoken loves watching baseball and is a fan of the New York Mets.

New York Mets outfielder Curtis Granderson was recently announced as the 2016 Roberto Clemente Award winner. This award is given each year to the major league baseball player who makes a significant off-the-field impact in the communities in which they serve.

Granderson was presented with the award during Game 3 of the World Series in Chicago. A native of the Windy City, Granderson played college baseball at the University of Illinois-Chicago. The Mets outfielder said he got particular satisfaction out of being able to receive the honor in front of his parents and in his hometown.

Roberto Clemente, for whom the award is named, was a Pittsburgh Pirates hall-of-fame player who tragically died in a 1972 plane crash. The flight was destined for Nicaragua and was carrying relief supplies to a country that was still reeling in the wake of a massive earthquake.

In addition to Granderson, three other Mets have won the Roberto Clemente Award: Gary Carter in 1989, Al Leiter in 2000, and Carlos Delgado in 2006.

Offensive Line Play – the Correct Stance

Offensive Line Play pic

Offensive Line Play
Image: active.com

Kevin Martoken earned his bachelor of science degree in accounting at Syracuse University. With over ten years of financial experience, Kevin Martoken is now a fund accountant at Grassi and Co. in New York City. Away from work-related activities, he enjoys playing football.

When playing football, the stance is a critical part of offensive line play. Your feet should remain slightly wider than the width of your shoulders. Centers have no stagger when they have an even stance; guards do have a staggered stance, which means their outside foot typically remains even with the middle or instep of their inside foot.

Toes and knees should point straight forward, while your hips are square to the line. Your outside hand needs to be used as your down hand unless you are playing center. Additionally, it’s beneficial to stretch out your hand out as far as it can go while keeping your back flat, but your eyes should remain up.

Best Overlooked Attractions and Sights in Rome

Castel Sant’Angelo Image: pinterest.com

Castel Sant’Angelo
Image: pinterest.com

 

Talented accounting and finance systems professional Kevin Martoken serves as a fund accountant at Grassi & Co., in New York. In this capacity, he prepares monthly financials, assists with external audits, and interacts with clients. In his free time, Kevin Martoken enjoys traveling around the world to such locations as Paris and Rome.

Rome is a wildly popular tourist destination, and most visitors are excited to see such attractions as the Vatican or Trevi Fountain. However, the city also is home to numerous attractions that often fall by the wayside. Below are just a few examples of these overlooked sights:

Castel Sant’Angelo: located near St. Peter’s Basilica, Castel Sant’Angelo rests along the Tiber River. It was originally built for Emperor Hadrian as a mausoleum, but it held several roles before finally becoming a tourist attraction and National Museum. Tickets are relatively cheap and allow visitors to explore everything from the museum to the tunnels and terraces.

– Baths of Caracalla: providing a unique look into the leisure time of ancient Romans, the Baths of Caracalla are often overshadowed by the nearby Colosseum. They were built between 212 and 219 AD and feature plenty of original decorations, including colored marble floors and glass mosaics. Visitors can explore the gym, spa, and sauna rooms, along with various study areas.

– EUR: a Fascist-era neighborhood, EUR rests just south of the center of Rome. It was commissioned by Benito Mussolini and was intended to be the sight of a future world’s fair. Most tourists do not know that the neighborhood exists, but it makes for an interesting experience that shows a different part of Roman history.

New Jersey Devils’ Street Devils Program Introduces Kids to Hockey

Jersey Devils pic

Jersey Devils
Image: devils.ice.nhl.com

 

Kevin Martoken prepares monthly and year-end financials and handles tax returns for hedge fund clients as a fund accountant at Grassi & Co. An avid sports fan, one of Kevin Martoken’s favorite professional teams is the New Jersey Devils.

In an effort to give back to its community, the New Jersey Devils sponsors several programs, including the AmeriHealth Street Devils. A joint program created by the National Hockey League and the Devils, Street Devils is a street hockey program for children. It was created in 1997 and has welcomed more than 18,000 children into the program.

The Street Devils program provides free educational and athletic programs to children in northern and central New Jersey. It is available to children between the ages of six and 16 and works through various schools, community centers, and hockey rinks. Organizations that participate in the Street Devils program receive no-bounce balls, sticks, goal nets, and other street hockey equipment from the NHL and New Jersey Devils.

To ensure that children learn about hockey properly and safely, the New Jersey Devils provides a start-up street hockey clinic for administrators and coaches. Coaches also receive informational and training manuals, and all participants in the program get individual playbooks. Many of the centers participating in the Street Devils program incorporate playoffs, skills contests, and awards ceremonies.

Jersey Devils Prospect System Improving

Jersey Devils pic

Jersey Devils
Image: devils.ice.nhl.com

Kevin Martoken has served as a fund accountant with Grassi & Co. in New York City since 2013, following prior roles at Ryan Associates and the Avenue Capital Group. When he is not working, Kevin Martoken follows New York metro area professional sports and is a fan of the NHL’s New Jersey Devils.

After years of dwelling in the NHL cellar in terms of their farm system, it appears the New Jersey Devils are now reaping the rewards of general manager Ray Shero’s recent efforts to invest in its crop of prospects.

With Michael McLeod, Pavel Zacha, and top goaltender prospect Mackenzie Blackwood leading the pack, the Devils have acquired top-caliber farm talent. While the team still has some needs on the defensive end, it’s developmental focus has been evident–so much so, in fact, that the team was recently ranked 19th by ESPN analyst Corey Pronman in his annual review each team’s prospect rankings.

The Devils are up seven spots from last year, when they were ranked 26th by Pronman. In addition to the team’s current prospects, the Devils also possess 17 draft picks over the next two years that will no doubt bolster those ranks. The position the team now finds itself in is a direct reflection on Shero’s work in his attempts to turn the team around.

Two Great Restaurants to Try in Venice

Osteria Boccadoro pic

Osteria Boccadoro
Image: tripadvisor.com

With more than 15 years of experience in the finance industry, Kevin Martoken currently serves as a private equity professional with Grassi & Co. in New York City. In his leisure time, Kevin Martoken enjoys traveling and has visited various destinations throughout Italy, including Venice.

For many, one of the best parts of traveling abroad to any country is the opportunity to partake in local cuisine. This is no exception in Venice, which boasts many well-reviewed fine dining establishments. Listed below are two restaurants in Venice that are worth a visit when taking a tour of the city of canals.

For authentic Venetian pasta and seafood, Osteria Boccadoro is an excellent choice. Nestled away from the high-traffic tourists areas, the restaurant is situated in a quaint Venetian square that offers a quiet respite from the hustle and bustle of the city proper. The restaurant specializes in traditional Venetian dishes that feature fresh fish, from-scratch pasta, and locally sourced ingredients. In addition, it boasts a well-stocked wine cellar and an on-site sommelier to help pair the perfect wine with your meal.

On the other end of the spectrum, Paradiso Perduto is a lively and upbeat restaurant near the Jewish Ghetto that specializes in wine and simple finger foods; some nights, patrons can be found dancing to in-house jazz bands. A more traditional restaurant experience is available as well, for those who would like to sit down and dine. The venue offers standard Venetian cuisine, which features large portions of fried fish and homemade pasta tossed in succulent fish sauces.